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China Club Nominated to Receive Program of the Year Award

China Night, Photo by Allison Corona

China Night, Photo by Allison Corona

The Chinese Club’s China Night was recently one of 8 distinguished programs on campus nominated to receive the Program of the Year award at the 2016 Boise State Campus Awards Ceremony. The Campus Awards Ceremony is an annual event hosted by the Division of Student Affairs that recognizes students, faculty, and staff who rise above the rest in making a difference for others and adding value to our university community.  Advisor Dr. Sharon Wei and eight student members represented the Chinese Club at the ceremony on April 25. Congratulations, Sharon!

20th Annual Treasure Valley High School Japanese Speech Contest held at Boise State

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The event took place, April 13th, 2016, in Boise State’s Student Union Building. More than 50 students from around the Treasure Valley participated.

Sponsored organizations:

– Consular office of Japan in Portland, Oregon

– Delta Airlines

– BSU Japan Club

– BSU Football Office

– Hosei University in Tokyo

– Center for School Improvement and Policy Studies

– World Languages

Emily McNamee, German Secondary Education Major, Wins Grants through the AATG

Emily McNamee, a junior German Secondary Education major from Boise, has won a grant through the AATG (American Association of Teachers of German) to attend a four week seminar in Leipzig, Germany (June 30-July 29).  She is one of only twenty participants from the US.

The seminar, “KoPrA: Kompetenzentwicklung der Kommunikationsstrategien, Präsentationstechniken und Aussprachetraining” [Developing Competencies in Communicative Strategies, Presentation Techniques and Pronunciation Training], aims to help K-16 teachers and pre-service teachers develop their language proficiencies in order to meet certification requirements in speaking.

AATG’s website provides further information about the seminar:

“Performance measurement, evaluation of oral skills, and methodology for teaching German as a foreign language will also be included. Intercultural interaction and knowledge of daily life in Germany are other important components of the seminar. The seminar will be conducted in German. Participants have the opportunity to get three graduate credits and to have a certified ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI).  This seminar is supported by a grant from the Transatlantik‐Programm der Bundesrepublik Deutschland through funds of the European Recovery Program (ERP) of the Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie. The grant covers accommodations including breakfast as well as all program costs and materials, along with a small travel stipend.”

Emily studied for one semester (fall 2015) in Lüneburg, Germany, through Boise State’s USAC exchange program, and is excited to return to Germany.

Here is what she reports about her past and upcoming adventures in Germany:

“Upon returning to Germany this summer I am most interested in increasing my language skills! I am especially excited about learning to teach German as a second language during the seminar. I look forward to exploring the country and to check cities off my must-see list. I am excited to be living in Leipzig, the campus looks beautiful! I also hope to visit Wartburg Castle where Luther translated the Bible.

From my stay in Lüneburg I learned a lot about what day-to-day life in Germany is really like outside of being a tourist. Germany is an interesting nation with a complex history that has shaped what it looks like today as the leader of the European Union and home to 81 million people! I visited many cities throughout Germany and was able to experience their diversity. My favorites were a tiny town on the North Sea called Travemünde and the university town of Heidelberg.

In summer of 2013 I spent one week in München (Munich) and 2 weeks in Rottenburg am Neckar with a host family through a GAPP exchange. My exchange partner and I became great friends and are still very close. I plan on visiting her on my return to Germany this summer. The GAPP experience changed the course of my life. It gave me a hunger for travel and a love of Germany. It was the deciding factor for attending Boise State and selecting my major. I now plan to give this kind of opportunity to future students after I begin my teaching career. ”

Mariah Devereux Herbeck and Jason Herbeck both presented their work at the annual Contemporary French and Francophone Studies Conference held in St. Louis, Missouri, March 17-19, 2016.

Mariah Devereux Herbeck and Jason Herbeck

Professors
Department of World Languages
College of Arts and Sciences
Mariah Devereux Herbeck and Jason Herbeck both presented their work at the annual Contemporary French and Francophone Studies Conference held in St. Louis, Missouri, March 17-19, 2016.MariahHerbeckDevereux Herbeck moderated a panel and presented her research, “‘Le Diable est dans l’escalier’: Demonizing the French Female Concierge.” The research analyzes the negative portrayal of an iconic figure of modern French society — the apartment building concierge — in two literary works from mid-20th-century France, “Échec à la concierge” by André de Richaud and Paris au mois d’aoûtby René Fallet.

JasonHerbeck1-225x300Herbeck presented a paper titled, “Point de rencontres: Une étude de passages ‘infrahumains’ dans Le Rond-point d’Évelyne Trouillot,” in which he examined the significance of human encounters in Haitian writer Trouillot’s latest novel. Taking place in Haiti’s sprawling capital, Port-au-Prince, the novel recounts the lives of three lonely protagonists from different socio-economic backgrounds whose lives literally and figuratively “collide” at the eponymous rotary in the final chapter of the novel. Reading the rotary as a metaphor for society’s fast-paced solution to avoiding challenging face-to-face encounters with others, Herbeck demonstrated how such calculated and even justified tactics can, due precisely to the missed opportunities for better understanding one another, lead to unexpectedly violent confrontations.

Department Opening: Assistant Professor of Spanish

Assistant Professor of Spanish

Department of World Languages

Search #AS-0003-16

Boise State University, powered by creativity and innovation, stands uniquely positioned in the Northwest as a metropolitan research university of distinction. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply for the position of Assistant Professor of Spanish. This is a tenure-line position with a renewable, nine-month contract, consisting of 50% teaching (15 credits per year; primarily at the upper-division), 30% research and 20% service. The position start date is August 15, 2016.

At a minimum you should have:

  •       Ph.D. in Spanish (in hand by August 1, 2016);
  •       Native or near-native fluency in Spanish and in English;
  •       Evidence of excellence in teaching Spanish;
  •       Familiarity with new technologies;
  •       Ability to implement communicative, standards-driven methodology;
  •       Commitment to establishing and maintaining a research agenda;
  •       Dedication to program building, including recruiting and advising Spanish majors;
  •       Cross-cultural sensitivity;
  •       Ability to teach Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition as well as Advanced Grammar and Syntax.

The preferred candidate will have:

  •       Ability to teach Spanish for native and heritage speakers;
  •       Expertise in applied linguistics (second language acquisition);
  •       Interest in becoming a certified ACTFL oral proficiency interviewer;
  •       Interest in Service-Learning/Community Engagement. 

Support: In order to foment active participation in research and conferences, the department provides each tenure-line faculty member with an individual research/travel allocation of approximately $2,000 per academic year.  The department also provides up-to-date computing support and individual office space for tenure-line faculty.

 Salary and benefits:  $50,000 per year, plus an excellent benefits package is available for eligible employees, for more information visit: http://hrs.boisestate.edu/careers/benefits/ .

To apply: Please submit a letter of application, CV, copies of transcripts, and three confidential letters of recommendation with contact information.  Application materials should be submitted via Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/34363

Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until finalists are identified. Applications received after that point may be considered if the position is not filled from the finalist pool.

About the University: http://www.boisestate.edu/

About the City of Boise: http://www.boisechamber.org/

About the Department: https://worldlang.boisestate.edu/

Background Investigations – Any offer of employment at Boise State University will be contingent upon the successful completion of a criminal background investigation and may require a credit and/or motor vehicle background investigation depending on the position. To view the University’s full Background Investigations policy, please go to http://policy.boisestate.edu.

Drug-Free Workplace – It is the policy of Boise State University to maintain a drug-free workplace and campus. For more information about this policy, please go to http://policy.boisestate.edu.

Jeanne Clery StatementNotice of Availability of Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

The Boise State University 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is provided to students, faculty, staff, and the public as part of the University’s commitment to safety and security on campus, and in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. Copies of the report may also be requested through the Campus Security and Police Services located at 2245 University Drive, Boise, Idaho 83706, by calling (208) 426-6911, or sending an email to policeuniversitysecurity@boisestate.edu.

The 2015 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Boise State University is now available here.

The report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on-campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by Boise State; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. It also includes the annual fire safety report and institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies for sexual assault, drug and alcohol use, and other matters.

“Basque Yourself” Summer Program

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Basque Yourself 1st International Summer School 2016

BY! More than just a summer school

Do you want to experience a dream summer in the European Capital of Culture, Donostia-San Sebastián? The University of the Basque Country, the leading institution in the Basque university system, offers you the chance to take part in the fascinating course “Basque Yourself 1st International School”, from 26th June to 15th July. Worth 12 ECTS credits, the course combines high quality teaching by renowned and prestigious professionals with a cultural and fun programme which allows you to get to know our land and customs first-hand. Basque-language courses, excursions to our valleys and coasts… all this managed by people who will guide and assist you throughout your stay with us. And why not give surfing a go on our beaches? Or get to know our music and dances first-hand?

Your summer starts here!

  • Where? San Sebastián-Donostia
  • When? from June 26 to July 15, 2016
  • Tuition: 1.800 euros
  • Number of credits: 12 ECTS credits.
  • Matriculation deadline: June 1, 2016.
  • Spaces are limited

BY offers, to any university student interested in the culture and identity of the Basque Country, a complete programme of seminars as well as cultural and fun activities in Donostia-San Sebastián, the European Capital of Culture 2016.

For more information on Basque Yourself 1st International Summer School 2016, please click here.

Boise State German Student, Tess Laub, Awarded Paid Internship in Germany

Tess Laub, a first year Boise State student, has won a paid summer internship in Germany through the national “AATG (American Association of Teachers of German) Internship Program for College Students.”

Tess graduated from Douglas High School in Minden, Nevada, and is a double-major at Boise State in German/Biology (emphasis in Zoology).  For the internship, she will be living and working at a family farm in northwest Germany this summer.  With German language skills, three years of FFA experience, as well as equine hospital training, Tess is well prepared for this unique adventure that combines her scientific field of study, her language studies and an immersion in culture.

This new AATG summer internship program offers 14 different paid internships in a variety of fields, such as social services, agriculture, computer science, medicine, finance, chemistry, childcare, and engineering.

The majority of these programs require two years of German instruction, but just one year of German qualifies a student to apply for the BMW Motorcycle Plant internship, for a technical internship at Siemens, and the internship at Infineon Technologies, a semi-conductor manufacturer.  Boise State offers all levels of German language instruction.

Read more here: http://go.boisestate.edu/current-students/news/

Former German Student, Catherine Barney, Creates “Russian Street Talk” in St. Petersburg, Russia

Catherine BarneyCatherine Barney, former Boise State Sociology and German minor, is currently abroad in St. Petersburg studying Russian. Learn more about her experience and adventures here: http://www.prospektmag.com/2016/01/russian-street-talk/

Adrian Kane Presents at the International Colloquium “The Invention of Nature in Latin America”

Kane_AdrianAdrian Kane, Professor of Spanish, was one of twenty scholars invited to participate in the international colloquium “The Invention of Nature in Latin America” at the University Tübingen, Germany from January 28th to 30th. In his presentation “Toward a Redefinition of Modernity in Luis Sepúlveda’s An Old Man Who Read Love Stories andWorld at the End of the World,” he argued that the Chilean author’s novels, respectively set in the Amazon and Patagonia, are examples of a recent body of Latin American environmentalist fiction that suggests a shift from an anthropocentric to an ecocentric vision of the relationship between humans and their environments.

2016 Basque Studies Workshops

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